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  • Illinois Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (177) Mental Stability and Alcohol Abuse Treatment
  • (512) Outpatient Alcohol Treatment
  • (335) DUI - DWI Offenders
  • (140) Court Appointed Client Services
  • (323) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
  • (43) Transitional Living Services
  • (54) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (161) Spanish Speaking
  • (68) Alcohol Detox
  • (43) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (19) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
  • (187) Services for Young Adults
  • (162) Dual Diagnosis
  • (48) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (42) Expectant Mothers
  • (142) Women
  • (117) Men
  • (68) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (27) Lesbian and Gay
  • (36) Over 50
  • (97) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (7) Health Services
  • (65) Foreign Languages other than Spanish
  • (28) Mental Balance Treatment Services
  • (6) Residential Beds for Adolescents
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Alcohol addiction is increasingly becoming a more notable problem in Illinois, which is creating the need for more quality alcohol rehab facilities to be located in the state. Choosing an alcohol rehab program for you or your loved one from Illinois that are struggling with an alcohol addiction can be a complicated process. There are a variety of different treatment options, such as inpatient, outpatient, short term and long term alcohol rehabs in Illinois, just to name a select few.

In an outpatient Illinois alcohol treatment program, the individual that is being treated for an alcohol addiction usually visits the treatment center at various intervals for a specific number of hours. Very few individuals from Illinois with a serious alcoholism problem can benefit long term from such a limited level of alcohol rehabilitation. In a residential alcohol rehab facility, the individual from Illinois will reside at the treatment facility; they will be able to receive an intense level of alcohol treatment and support that will be available to them 24 hours a day.

The first step in an Illinois alcohol rehab center is the alcohol detoxification and this can trigger withdrawal symptoms. It is recommended that the detox process be supervised by a professional. After detox has successfully been completed, an individual from Illinois can then begin to focus on the other elements of the alcohol treatment program; these components of rehabilitation may include counseling, behavior modification techniques, and drug relapse prevention education. The ultimate goal in the treatment of an alcohol addiction is long term abstinence, and choosing the best alcohol rehab program can be the most important step towards reaching that goal.


Illinois alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon an Illinois police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

In Illinois, the highest number of alcohol related fatalities and the highest percentage of total fatalities as drunk driving deaths both occurred the same year, which was 1982. Since that time, the percentage and the actual number of alcohol related deaths has decreased substantially. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 35% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Illinois, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Illinois drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals in Illinois who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

1,651

1,014

61

879

53

1983

1,526

909

60

817

54

1984

1,547

892

58

780

50

1985

1,534

835

54

723

47

1986

1,596

869

54

748

47

1987

1,654

843

51

742

45

1988

1,837

939

51

812

44

1989

1,748

898

51

779

45

1990

1,589

826

52

707

44

1991

1,448

736

51

629

43

1992

1,384

680

49

575

42

1993

1,392

638

46

557

40

1994

1,554

687

44

600

39

1995

1,586

700

44

614

39

1996

1,477

678

46

590

40

1997

1,397

597

43

505

36

1998

1,393

619

44

525

38

1999

1,456

646

44

543

37

2000

1,418

628

44

536

38

2001

1,414

623

44

537

38

2002

1,420

653

46

556

39

2003

1,453

639

44

539

37

2004

1,356

604

45

517

38

2005

1,361

580

43

477

35

2006

1,254

540

43

444

35

2007

1,249

507

41

434

35

2008

1,043

434

42

362

35



2003-2004 Illinois Alcohol Related Issue:

Percentage %

Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

8.88%

[14th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

17.5%

[9th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

58%

[22nd of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4.7%

[27th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

604

[5th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.473 per 10,000 people

[36th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

45%

[6th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

53.12%

[19th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Illinois?

  • Non-commercial drivers age 21+ in Illinois are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in Illinois are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In Illinois, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers 21 and under in Illinois are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is greater than zero.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Illinois

  • Any person convicted of DUI in Illinois faces up to one year in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $2,500.
  • For a second conviction in Illinois within five years of the previous violation, the offender must serve a mandatory minimum of 5 days in prison or 240 hours of community service.
  • In the case of a third or subsequent violation within five years of a previous violation, the offender in Illinois must serve a mandatory minimum prison term of 10 days or 480 hours of community service.

Additional Penalties in Illinois for DUI with a BAC of .16 or More

  • Any person in Illinois convicted of a first DUI whose BAC was .16 or more is subject an additional mandatory minimum fine of $500 and a mandatory minimum of 100 hours of community service.
  • Any person in Illinois convicted of a second DUI within 10 years of a previous violation whose BAC at the time of the second violation was .16 or more is subject to an additional mandatory minimum prison term of two days and an additional mandatory minimum fine of $1,250.
  • A person in Illinois convicted of a third DUI within 20 years of a previous violation whose BAC at the time of the third violation was .16 or more is subject to an additional mandatory minimum of 90 days in prison and an additional mandatory minimum fine of $1,250.

Additional Penalties in Illinois for DUI while Transporting a Child Under 16

A person in Illinois who commits a DUI while transporting a child under 16 is subject to an additional mandatory minimum fine of $1,000, an additional mandatory minimum 140 hours of community service, which must include 40 hours of service benefiting children, and an additional two days in prison.

Driver's License Revocation Periods

  • Any person in Illinois who is convicted of DUI will have his or her driver's license revoked. Generally, for a first offense, the revocation period is one year. The offender, however, must apply for a reinstatement after the expiration of one year. The reinstatement may or may not be granted. If, however, the offender's BAC was .16 or greater, application for reinstatement cannot be made until two years have passed.
  • A person in Illinois who is convicted of a second DUI within 20 years of the first conviction may not make application for a reinstated license until after the expiration of five years.
  • A person in Illinois who is convicted of a third DUI within 20 years may not make application for a reinstated license until after the expiration of 10 years.
  • A person in Illinois whose license was revoked for DUI may or may not be eligible to apply for a restricted license due to hardship.
  • A person in Illinois who is convicted of a fourth of subsequent DUI may not apply for a reinstated license.

Ignition Interlock

Repeat offenders are required to use an ignition interlock system for a time period deemed appropriate by the Secretary of State of Illinois.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties associated with Illinois' DUI laws, a commercial driver who is convicted of DUI while operating any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for at least one year. If, however, the offender was driving a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is at least three years. If a commercial driver in Illinois commits a second DUI while driving any vehicle, the offender will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of not less than 10 years.

School Bus Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may be imposed under Illinois' DUI laws, a school bus driver who commits a DUI while driving a school bus with a person 18 or under in the bus at the time of the violation will be guilty of aggravated DUI. A person in Illinois who is convicted of aggravated DUI faces one to three years in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $25,000.

Drivers Under 21

In addition to other penalties that may apply, an underage driver who commits DUI in Illinois may be ordered to participate in Illinois' Youthful Intoxicated Drivers' Visitation Program. This program consists of supervised visitation at a variety of facilities, including a state or private rehabilitation facility that cares for motor vehicle accident victims injured by drunk drivers, a facility that cares for advanced alcoholics so that the minor can observe persons in terminal stages of alcoholism, and a county morgue so that the minor can observe victims of drunk drivers.

What is Illinois' "Cause of Action Against Seller for Injury by Intoxicated Person" Statute?

Under this statute, every person in Illinois who is injured by an intoxicated person has a right of action against the licensed Illinois drinking establishment that sold the alcohol that caused the intoxication. This statute, however, does not permit the intoxicated person to bring an action for injuries that were caused by his own intoxication.

Criminal Penalties for Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to a Minor

It is a crime in Illinois to sell or furnish alcohol to a person under 21. A violation of this statute subjects the offender to up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. If, however, a death occurs as a result of a violation of this statute, the person who sold or furnished the alcohol faces one to three years in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $25,000 in the case of an individual, and up to $50,000 in the case of a corporation.

Criminal Penalties for Permitting a Minor to Drink Alcohol

Anyone in Illinois who knowingly permits a gathering at their residence where one or more persons under 21 are consuming alcohol faces up to one year in prison and is subject to pay a fine of up to $2,500.

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  • One night of heavy alcohol consumption can impair your ability to think abstractly for up to 30 days.
  • In a study of parents who significantly maltreat their children, alcohol abuse was specifically associated with physical abuse.
  • In the United States, beer ranks fourth in consumption of any kind of beverage behind soft drinks, milk and coffee.
  • Alcoholics, do not process alcohol as effectively as non-alcoholics. The alcoholicís liver converts alcohol into acetaldehyde at twice the normal rate. At the same time, their ability to convert acetaldehyde into acetic acid is much slower than non-alcoholics. Consequently, the higher concentrations of acetaldehyde can damage liver cells, cause inflammation and exhaust the bodyís immune system. The liverís ability to absorb nutrients is compromised. Unfortunately, the damage is not restricted to the liver. An abundance of acetaldehyde will eventually enter the bloodstream which can affect other organs in the body such as the heart or pancreas. It can also affect the brain. The brain, like most body organs, is vulnerable to injury from alcohol consumption. Acetaldehyde can block proper brain function such as the firing of neurotransmitters which affect oneís mood, memory, and behavior.